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Video Transcripts

Nontraditional Sources: Dissertations or Theses

Last updated 6/13/2016

 

Visual: Walden logo appears at bottom of screen along with notepad and pencil background.

Audio: Guitar music plays.

 

Visual: “Walden University Writing Center. Your writing, grammar, and APA experts” appears in center of screen. Background changes to stack of leather-bound books on a table. “Nontraditional Sources. Dissertation or Thesis”  text appears in center of screen. Slide changes to one titled “Dissertation or Thesis”. On the slide there are two examples of reference entries. The first reference entry reads: Henry, L.A., Castek, J., O’Bryne, W.I., & Zawilinsky, L. (2012). Using peer collaboration to support online reading, writing, and communication (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from http://www-tandfonline-com/doi/abs/10.1080/10573569.2012.676431 Next to first reference is a textbox which reads: Retrieved from institutional or personal website.

Below the first reference is second reference, which reads: Henry, L.A., Castek, J., O’Bryne, W.I., & Zawilinsky, L. (2012). Using peer collaboration to support online reading, writing, and communication (Doctoral dissertation). Available from ProQuest Digital Dissertations database. (AAT 55206524)  Next to this reference is a text box which reads: Retrieved from a database

Audio: For a dissertation or thesis, you'll notice that most of this information is going to be similar to that sort of uncommon source that we showed earlier. You have your authors. Notice that when you have multiple authors, you use commas to separate them, and then you would use the ampersand before the very last one, the symbol that means "and ." You don’t write out the word “and” in your reference list,  you use the symbol here. But dissertations and theses are usually retrieved from a database or an institutional or personal website, so you can see the difference in the retrieval information in the first one we have “retrieved from”, and then the URL. In the second one, we have “available from ProQuest digital dissertations and database” and we have the specific number here. So depending on where you got the information from and how it was presented, you're going to use kind of one of these formats in general. Notice that extra information, doctoral dissertation, is actually in parentheses here. And so that's a little bit different, but in general, we're following the same format as the references list, which is the author's surname, and the first initials, the year of publication, the title information, and then the publication information. Or retrieval information in this case.

 

Visual: Slide changes to notebook with Walden logo from introduction. Text reads: “Walden University Writing Center. Questions? E-mail writingsupport@waldenu.edu.”