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Video Transcripts

Nontraditional Sources: Multiple Sources in One Citation

Last updated 5/17/2016

 

Visual: The words “Walden University Writing Center” and the Walden University Writing Center logo on a blank page of a notebook with a pencil. The slogan “Your writing, grammar, and APA experts” appears. The screen shifts to present the words “Nontraditional Sources” with the title “Citing Multiple Sources in One Citation” underneath.

Audio: Music plays.

 

Visual: A slide appears with the heading, “Final Quick Tips: Picky Citation Rules.” There is a subheading that reads, “Multiple sources in a single citation.” In a green box in the center of the screen is an excerpted sentence from a paper. It reads, “Several studies have linked increased television watching to a rise in rates of obesity (Cappell, 2012; Lenard & Swann, 2009; Richardson, 2012). Underneath this box is a note in a small, orange box. It reads, “Semicolon to separate sources” with an arrow pointing to one of the semicolons in the excerpted sentence’s citation.

Audio: If you are using a parenthetical citation in your text, you might want to cite multiple sources because they're all sort of saying the same thing. You can do that, and you would actually just want to separate them with a semicolon.

APA actually prefers that you do not use back-to-back parentheses; meaning you don't want a set of parentheses and then a set of parentheses and then a set of parentheses, right?

You only want one set of parentheses and then all the information inside of it is divided by those semicolons. So the semicolons show that there is a division between information.

So that's one thing to keep in mind if you're going to cite multiple sources in that single citation.

 

Visual: The words “Walden University Writing Center” and the Walden University Writing Center logo on a blank page of a notebook with a pencil. In the middle it says, “Questions? E-mail writingsupport@waldenu.edu.”