Skip to main content

Video Transcripts

APA Formatting & Style: Point of View

Last updated 4/21/2016

 

Visual: Walden logo at bottom of screen along with notepad and pencil background.

Audio: Guitar music.

 

Visual: “Walden University Writing Center. Your writing, grammar, and APA experts” appears in the center of the screen. Background changes to another notebook on a table, with a person sitting behind it, and a bright blue box. Text on the screen appears: “APA Formatting & Style: Point of View.” Slide changes to a mostly gray slide with two blue box in the center & a header that reads: Point of View.

Above the two boxes it reads: Avoid referring to yourself in the third person.

In the first blue box is the following: The researcher will analyze the lesson plan.

In the second blue box is the following: The author reviewed the case study.

In the bottom right corner there is a green box that reads: See page 69 in the APA 6th Edition.

 

Audio: You want to avoid referring to yourself in the third person. Now, for this, you want to follow whatever the requirements are for the assignment. So, if your instructor or your professor has specific guidelines about how to refer to yourself or whether to refer to yourself, you want to go with what your instructor or professor says. But in terms of strictly APA style, you want to avoid referring to yourself in the third person because that can be potentially confusing or ambiguous, especially if you’re doing something like a literature review talking about lots of different works by different authors. So when you say the author or the researcher, it’s not automatically clear you’re talking about yourself. So, instead of using the third person, you would say, “I.”

 

Visual: Slide changes a mostly gray slide with two blue boxes in the center and a header that reads: Point of View.

Above the two boxes it reads: Avoid referring to yourself in the third person.

In the first blue box is the following: I will analyze the lesson plan.

In the second blue box is the following: The author reviewed the case study.

In the bottom right corner there is a green box that reads: See page 69 in the APA 6th Edition.

Audio: So when you’re discussing your own actions, things that you did, you would say, “I will analyze the lesson plan,” or, “I reviewed the case study.”

 

Visual: Slide changes a mostly gray slide with two blue boxes in the center and a header that reads: Point of View.

Above the two boxes it reads: Avoid referring to yourself in the third person

In the first blue box is the following: I will analyze the lesson plan.

In the second blue box is the following: I reviewed the case study.

In the bottom right corner there is a green box that reads: See page 69 in the APA 6th Edition.

Audio: You don’t want to over rely…

 

Visual: Slide changes a mostly gray slide with two blue boxes in the center and a header that reads: Point of View.

Above the two boxes it reads: Avoid “I think” or “I believe” statements.

In the first blue box is the following: I think that education is a right everyone should have.

In the second blue box is the following: I believe that businesses that treat employees fairly will succeed.

In the bottom right corner, there is a green box that reads: See page 69 in the APA 6th Edition.

Audio: …on the use of the word I because you still want to make it scholarly. You still want to have an objective, authoritative, scholarly tone, so you don’t want to rely on a bunch of I statements. Avoid “I think” or “I believe” statements because when you’re writing scholarly work, you often find you can leave those phrases out. So instead of, “I think education is a right everyone should have,” you can just…

 

Visual: Slide changes a mostly gray slide with two blue boxes in the center and a header that reads: Point of View.

Above the two boxes it reads: Avoid “I think” or “I believe” statements.

In the first blue box is the following: Education is a right everyone should have.

In the second blue box is the following: I believe that businesses that treat employees fairly will succeed.

In the bottom right corner there is a green box that reads: See page 69 in the APA 6th Edition.

Audio: …cut the first part off. “Education is a right everyone should have,” and you would support that with your own analysis and evidence that you come up with if you’re doing a research paper. So you would find support for that statement. You don’t need to rely on, “I think,” or “I believe,” because when you’re doing scholarly writing, you can’t really use your feelings or own beliefs as support. You need to use empirical and scholarly evidence.

 

Visual: Slide changes a mostly gray slide with two blue boxes in the center and a header that reads: Point of View.

Above the two boxes it reads: Avoid “I think” or “I believe” statements.

In the first blue box is the following: Education is a right everyone should have.

In the second blue box is the following: Businesses that treat employees fairly will succeed.

In the bottom right corner there is a green box that reads: See page 69 in the APA 6th Edition.

Audio: So if you see yourself using “I think” or “I believe” a lot and it’s not something like a reflection paper or it’s actually scholarly, it’s supposed to be a research paper, you can cut those out and just base it on clear, objective statements without relying on the overuse of I.

 

Visual: Slide changes a mostly gray slide with two blue boxes in the center and a header that reads: Point of View.

Above the two boxes it reads: Avoid referring to the reader with “we” or “you.”

In the blue box is the following: We need to ensure students have strong reading skills. Teachers need to ensure students have strong reading skills.

Audio: Kind of along those same lines, you may have read a lot of things where the author will directly address the intended audience and say things like, “We see that blah blah blah,” or “You may understand that blah blah blah.” In APA style, it is best to avoid that because the goal of APA style is clear, specific, objective language.

When you say things like we or you, that means you’re implicitly making an assumption about who your readers are. “We need to ensure students have strong reading skills.” I’m not sure. What do you mean, “we”? I’m not a teacher or parent; I’m not involved with children at all. So you want to make sure instead of saying we and you, you use more specific language to talk about the exact, precise groups of people that you mean. So, “Parents need to ensure students have strong reading skills.” It’s a specific statement and doesn’t call on the reader to guess about what you mean, and it means that you avoid making assumptions about who your readers are. That's the reason in APA style we avoid we and you—it's to maintain objectivity and specificity.       

 

Audio: Guitar music

Visual: “Walden University Writing Center. Questions? E-mail writingsupport@waldenu.edu” appears in the center of the screen.