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Video Transcripts

Using Quotations: Integrating Quotes in the Middle of a Sentence

Last updated 10/30/2016

 

Visual: The screen shows the Walden University Writing Center logo along with a pencil and notebook. “Walden University Writing Center.” “Your writing, grammar, and APA experts” appears in center of screen. The background changes to a the title of the video with a library shelf of books as a background.

Audio: Guitar music plays.

 

Visual: Slide changes to the title “Integrating a Quote in the Middle of a Sentence” and the following examples:

In-text citation: Johnson et al. (2010) stated that “educators should control their students in the classroom in order to avoid misbehavior, misconduct, and decreased learning” (p. 57), therefore instructor training should prioritize classroom management techniques to promote increased student learning.

Parenthetical citation: Recommendations for classroom management include reasoning such as “educators should control their students in the classroom in order to avoid misbehavior, misconduct, and decreased learning” (Johnson et al., 2010, p. 57), therefore instructor training should prioritize classroom management techniques to promote increased student learning.

Audio: Like a paraphrase, you want to include that lead-in and lead-out for your quote to help smooth that transition to help integrate it into your work.

And, in fact, I think it's more effective to use a quote in the middle of a sentence as part of a larger sentence. And the reason for that is that when you have just a quote by itself, kind of plopped into your paper, it's sort of like if you were having a conversation with someone and another person came in and just started—and then they just said something to you and then they left. And you wouldn't know who they were, why they were there, how what they were saying really related to what you were talking about. So you as the author need to kind of ease that person into the conversation if you're having them as a quote in your work. And a really effective way to do that can be to have these kind of quotes in the middle of a larger sentence so that you can add that analysis and that authorial synthesis for your quotation.

So I have a couple of examples here. The first is the in-text where the author's name is part of the sentence. So you can see there, we have a continued thought after the quotation that kind of explains the conclusions that this writer would like the audience to draw from that quote.

And likewise, you can use it with a parenthetical citation as well. So you don't have to use the author's name in text to include a quote. So in this case, I didn't use Johnson et al. as part of the sentence, which means that I needed even more of a transition before the quote, right? Because I had to kind of ground the reader in the ideas that I was going to talk about before I included that quote.

So those are a couple different options for having that quote in the middle of a larger sentence to create that kind of lead-in and lead-out.

 

Visual: “Walden University Writing Center. Questions? E-mail writingsupport@waldenu.edu” appears in center of screen.

Audio: Guitar music.